Mutual Consent in Maryland doesn’t need to be a Mystery

Up until 2015, Marylanders looking for an absolute divorce could only choose from a small number of immediate divorce conditions or separate for at least 12 months before filing. Mutual consent divorce is a new third option that forgoes the year of waiting and allows for immediate filing.

Who Qualifies for a Mutual Consent Divorce in Maryland?

Maryland couples who do not share a minor child can file for mutual consent divorce. If you have minor children from previous relationships, you can still file for a mutual consent divorce. Once you decide to divorce, you must make a separation agreement that resolves the division of all marital property, pensions and alimony (whether by a mutual waiver or specific amounts and durations). Both parties must sign the document and file it with the Court, along with their complaint based on mutual consent. The Court will set a hearing date that both parties must attend.

How is Mutual Consent Divorce a Better Option?

Previously, couples who didn’t share children needed to maintain two residences for at least a year before filing for divorce. The process could be costly and impractical, especially since the couple already discussed their issues and decided to formally divorce. With mutual consent divorce, you can cohabitate throughout the divorce period, and even afterwards, without it ever entering into the legal equation. Mutual consent divorce gives you more freedom and can save you a lot of financial stress.

Are There Any Bumps in the Road?

Mutual consent divorce might sound too simple to be true. While the process can be smooth, the division of marital property and alimony agreement can add a lot of time to the equation. Be sure to use an attorney you trust and carefully assess all shared property and assets before agreeing, even verbally, to anything. If you are ready to get the mutual consent divorce process started, Lebovitz Law is here to help. Contact us today at (410) 828-0680.

About Maryland Family and Real Estate Law
General information and commentary on child custody, support, divorce, separation, visitation, real estate, landlord/tenant and loss mitigation

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